Virtual School Day

K-5 Art Choices for Virtual School Days

6/15

Dear Willard Families,

Here are a few art ideas for summer. Thank you for drawing with me this spring!

Create-your-own coloring pages: 

Any theme could be used for a coloring page idea (designs, animals, sports, flowers, toys). Start by drawing with a pencil and outline the parts and shapes of your picture. Big, basic shapes are a good way to start (a circle for the center of a flower, ovals for the petals, a thin rectangle for the stem). Students can add lines and designs inside the shapes to make their coloring page more detailed (and more challenging to color in) if they would like to. Once the outline is done, trace over the pencil lines with one color of crayon, color pencil or marker to create your coloring page. Now…color it in! 

Make an accordion-fold book: 

Fold a piece of paper in half the tall way. Then fold that tall paper into thirds (like an accordion) to create a small book with three drawing spaces. Choose a theme (for example: flowers, sports, designs, animals) and draw three little pictures that go together. Older students could try to make six small drawings if they would like, by drawing on the front and back of the book. Opening the book all the way (unfolding it) gives students space for a large drawing folded inside the book. For example, a book with drawings of animals in each square could be opened up to show the habitat drawn inside. 

Summer sketchbook: 

A summer sketchbook is a nice way to record the small moments of summer. Your child may draw a picture of their pet one day or doodle designs the next. I like to write the date in the corner of sketchbook drawings to help remember the day when we look back upon them. “Sketchbooks” can simply be a few pieces of paper folded in half, accordion books like the one listed above, or a collection of drawings kept together in a folder. (To make a mini portfolio to hold drawings see below).

Mini portfolio (folder):

Making mini portfolios is a fun activity in the art room. Students like to have a special folder to hold their work. To make a mini portfolio, hold a piece of paper horizontally (the long way). Fold the bottom edge up the paper up about 2 inches. Then fold the paper in half like a card. When you open the folder you’ll see that there is a little pocket flap at the bottom. Students can decorate their portfolio and then use it as a place to save drawings over the summer.

 

6/8

Dear Willard Families,

At school, students and I talk about “thinking like an artist”. When we are at school, I begin art class by asking students motivating questions about a theme or the art materials to get them thinking about ideas for their artwork and how they are going to start. In each week’s choices you will see those types of motivating questions listed. Briefly discussing these questions with your child, and having them offer a few answers before they start drawing, may help them organize their thoughts and give them a starting point for the work. The finished artwork may look very different than what your child discussed before starting—the goal of the questions is to motivate them to start and to help them navigate their way through the work. Along the way in their artwork, they will make discoveries, mistakes and take new paths—and doing all of that is thinking like an artist!

Grade level suggestions are optional so please choose whichever idea your child would like. I will continue to update the list with new options. 

K, 1 & 2:

Spring Self-Portraits: Traditionally at this time of the school year students in Kindergarten, First and Second Grades would be drawing their spring self-portraits in the art room. If your child would like to try this drawing, you can help them by asking a few motivating questions. Holding a paper the tall way (so there is room for them to fit themselves on the page), ask them: “What shape could you draw for your head? Where on the paper will you draw your head so that you have room for your whole picture? What shapes could you draw for your outfit? What details will you add for your face? Students can also create a background for their self-portrait if they would like to. In class, I encourage students to keep going and try again when mistakes or challenges arise. Seeing eraser marks and marker “mistakes” in the finished drawing shows your child’s thinking. However, there are times when trying to fix problems in a drawing just doesn’t work and students choose to start over. They know that they are “the artist in charge” of their artwork and can start over if they want to. Every time they practice drawing they will gain confidence.

3, 4 & 5:

Games: Create your own card game or board game. How can you design the cards or game board? Will there be a theme (animals? sports? trivia?) How do you play? Write down the rules. Teach a family member how to play!

 

K & 1:

Family Fun Drawings: What do you like to do when you are wearing sneakers? What games do you like to play with your family? How can you show yourself wearing sneakers and/or playing with your family in a drawing?

House & Building Drawings: How can you draw a house or a building? What parts does a house or building have? What shapes will you use for the different parts of the house? What will you draw in the background? What will the weather be like in your picture?

Shape Drawings: Choose two or three shapes and draw them on your paper. Look at the shapes and decide…what could they be? What could a rectangle be? A building? A tree? What could a circle be? The sun? The center of a flower? A ball? What could a triangle be? The roof of a house? A sail on a sailboat? What kinds of pictures can you draw by starting with some shapes and then turning them into things?

Bird Drawings: How can you draw a picture of a bird? What parts does a bird have? How can you draw the parts of a bird one shape at a time? What shapes and lines can you draw to decorate the bird’s feathers and wings? Will you make your bird look real or imaginary? Where will your bird be in the picture: in a tree, in a nest, flying? What season will it be in your picture?

2 & 3:

Drawing about Reading: Where do you like to read? Do you have a favorite place to read with your family? How can you draw a picture about a book you like or showing your family reading?

Weather Drawings: How can you draw a picture about the weather? Will it be sunny or cloudy in your picture? What marks will you make with your drawing supplies to show the textures of things like rain, wind, clouds or snow? Will you use colors? Will your drawing be horizontal or vertical?

Animal and Habitat Drawings: What kind of animal (or animals) will you draw? What do you know about where this animal lives? What shapes do you need to draw for your animal? How can you draw the animal one shape at a time? How will you show if it has fur, scales or feathers? How will you show the textures of the animal’s habitat: will there be grass, rocks or trees? How big will your animal be and how big will you make the objects and landscape around it?

Space drawings: How can you draw a picture about space? Will you make your drawing look real or imaginary? Will you show planets, stars, space ships and space stations? What will be close-up and what will be far away? What colors and shapes will you use? What designs will you draw on the planets?

4 & 5:

Rainy Day drawings: What do you like to do when it rains? Read a book? Watch a movie with your family? Play a board game? How will you show that it is raining in your picture?

Landscape Drawings: What is a landscape? Is there a place that holds a special memory for you? Will it be a close-up view or a faraway view? How will you show what is in front and what is behind or what is near and what is far? What part of your view will reach the edges of the paper? How will you show the season and the time of day? What kinds of marks will you make with your drawing supplies to show textures (for example: clouds, grass, rocks, etc.), Will you use colors? Will your drawing be horizontal or vertical?

Sports and Games: What sports or games do you like to play? Soccer? Chess? Basketball? Puzzles? How can you draw a picture of yourself playing a sport or game? Will you include your family in the picture?

Designs: How can you use lines and shapes to make a drawing? Will you include colors or different kids of lines (wavy, dotted, swirly)? Think about the textures you could create with your drawing supplies. Will you hold your paper the long or tall way?

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Dear Willard Families,

Last week I saw many signs of spring outside my living room window. So far I have noticed new grass growing, some mud in the yard (thanks to all of the spring rain!), buds on trees and plants, birds singing in the morning and colorful sunsets. You will see a few spring-themed choices, along with others, added to the grade-level options below. As always, the grade-level suggestions are optional. You can choose whichever option your child would like and choose from previous weeks as well.

K:

  • Draw a picture of a butterfly. What parts does a butterfly have? How can you draw the parts of a butterfly one shape at a time? What shapes and lines can you draw to decorate the butterfly’s wings?

1:

  • Draw a picture of a garden. Will you draw flowers and plants? Vegetables? Will you draw any insects or animals in your garden?

2:

  • Draw a picture of a castle. What parts, shapes and lines will you draw? Will your castle have doors, windows or towers? Make it look real or imaginary. 

3:

  • Draw an imaginary city or town. What will you include in your town? What shapes and sizes of buildings will you draw? What season will it be in your picture? 

4 & 5:

  • Observation drawing: draw a picture of your shoes. Look at and draw a picture of your favorite shoes. Think about the outside lines, the inside shapes and how you can draw the different textures you see.

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Dear Willard Families,

I have added some new drawing choices below. The grade levels listed are recommendations, but feel free to choose ideas from different grade levels that may be of interest to your child. Also, it is fine to repeat activities. For example, if your child chooses to draw an animal this week, they can draw a different animal next week. Perhaps they want to draw a new animal each week and create a collection of animal drawings; that’s great. Any drawing supplies that you already have at home such as pencils will do. Students should always check with a parent first before using art and drawing supplies!

Often a conversation with your child about their work will give you a better understanding of what your child was thinking about and trying to achieve with the artwork. A great way to start a conversation about a piece of artwork is simply to say: “Tell me about your picture!” or “What would you like me to notice about your drawing?”

 

K:   Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat

1:  Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • make an observation drawing of your favorite toy
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat
  • draw your own imaginary creature in an imaginary habitat 

2:  Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • make an observation drawing of your favorite toy, or something else at home
  • build something with Legos or blocks, etc., draw a picture of what you built
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat
  • draw your own imaginary creature in an imaginary habitat 

3: Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • make an observation drawing of your favorite toy, or something else at home
  • build something with Legos or blocks, etc., draw a picture or what you built
  • fold paper to make a book, draw the story of your day 
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat
  • draw your own imaginary creature in an imaginary habitat 
  • make an accordion-fold book. Fold a piece of paper in half the tall way. Then fold that tall paper into thirds (like an accordion) to create a small book with three drawing spaces. Choose a theme (for example: flowers, sports, designs, animals) and draw three little pictures that go together.

4: Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • make an observation drawing of your favorite toy, or something else at home
  • build something with Legos or blocks, etc., draw a picture or what you built
  • fold paper to make a book, draw the story of your day
  • create a comic strip
  • invent a superhero, make a comic strip about your superhero
  • draw a self-portrait 
  • draw a self-portrait, making a funny face in the mirror
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat
  • draw your own imaginary creature in an imaginary habitat 
  • make an accordion-fold book. Fold a piece of paper in half the tall way. Then fold that tall paper into thirds (like an accordion) to create a small book with three drawing spaces. Choose a theme (for example: flowers, sports, designs, animals) and draw three little pictures that go together. Older students could try to make six small drawings if they would like, by drawing on the front and back of the book.
  • draw about the seasons: Fold a paper in half and then open it. Now imagine a landscape (outside place) that you could draw showing two different seasons. For example, draw an apple orchard in the fall on the left half of the paper and an apple orchard in the winter on the right half of the paper. Or draw two different landscapes showing different seasons (a beach for summer and a snowy day for winter). If you would like to draw about all four seasons, you can fold your paper into four sections.

5: Draw a picture of:

  • your family
  • you playing inside or outside
  • what you see when you look out the window
  • make an observation drawing of your favorite toy something else at home
  • build something with Legos or blocks, etc., draw a picture or what you built
  • fold paper to make a book, draw the story of your day
  • create a comic strip
  • invent a superhero, make a comic strip about your superhero
  • draw a self-portrait 
  • draw a self-portrait, making a funny face in the mirror
  • do an observation drawing of someone else in your family
  • do an observation drawing of your pet
  • draw a favorite animal and its habitat
  • draw your own imaginary creature in an imaginary habitat 
  • make an accordion-fold book. Fold a piece of paper in half the tall way. Then fold that tall paper into thirds (like an accordion) to create a small book with three drawing spaces. Choose a theme (for example: flowers, sports, designs, animals) and draw three little pictures that go together. Older students could try to make six small drawings if they would like, by drawing on the front and back of the book
  • draw about the seasons: Fold a paper in half and then open it. Now imagine a landscape (outside place) that you could draw showing two different seasons. For example, draw an apple orchard in the fall on the left half of the paper and an apple orchard in the winter on the right half of the paper. Or draw two different landscapes showing different seasons (a beach for summer and a snowy day for winter). If you would like to draw about all four seasons, you can fold your paper into four sections.
  • set up a group of stuffed animals or toys and make an observation drawing of what you see. (For younger students use only 1 or 2 toys; older students could manage more).